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Ecumenical advocacy conference set for Washington D.C this weekend; International Women’s Day today
Daybook

3/8/2005
[Episcopal News Service]  The third annual Ecumenical Advocacy Days for Global Peace with Justice will be held March 11-14 in Washington, D.C.

The conference theme “Make All Things New” coincides with a new presidential term, a new Congress and a new opportunity for people of faith to learn together and raise their voices in advocacy for a more just and peaceful world.

Participants gathered will address urgent global issues and examine U.S. policy regarding the Middle East, Africa, Asia, Latin America, global economic justice, global security, eco-justice and U.S. domestic issues. They will also issue briefings and receive training in advocacy.

Speakers will include Dr. Maryann Cusimano Love, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C.; Bishop Vashti McKenzie, African Methodist Episcopal Church; and Baldemar Velasquez, founder/president, Farm Labor Organizing Committee. Rick Ufford-Chase, Presbyterian Church, will moderate.

The Episcopal Church is one of several supporters of Ecumenical Advocacy Days for Global Peace with Justice which highlights the urgency of pursuing wise and peaceful solutions to conflicts and the need for aid, debt and trade policies that benefit our impoverished brothers and sisters throughout the world.

For further information call 202.543.4150 or email info@advocacydays.org
 
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March 8 is International Women’s Day

[ENS] Today marks International Women’s Day. The day celebrates the collective achievements and triumphs of women and recognizes the challenges they face worldwide.

Since February 28, women representing churches and dioceses within the Anglican Communion have been delegates at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women in New York City. Their meetings promoting women’s rights in political, economic, social, civic, and educational fields will conclude on March 11.

In the coming weeks, ENS will stream video interviews to their website featuring women from the Anglican delegation. Please visit http://www.episcopalchurch.org/ens/

Episcopal Relief and Development’s partnerships are also empowering women in communities around the world, including Liberia, El Salvador, South Africa, and Afghanistan.
 
For more information on the program, visit the “Our Programs” section on http://www.er-d.org/

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Note: The following titles are available from the Episcopal Book/Resource Center, 815 Second Avenue, New York, NY  10017; 800.334.7626 or 212.716.6118 http://www.episcopalbookstore.org/


To Read: GLOBALIZATION AND THE GOOD edited by Peter Heslam (Grand Rapids, Michigan/ Cambridge U.K.: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2004; 137 pages; $20.00)
 
Globalization is the buzzword of the moment. But what exactly does it mean? Is globalization primarily a force for good or a force for evil? In this edited collection of papers — deriving from events organized by the Capitalism Project at the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity — leading business people, academics and theologians explore the contours of a Christian response. Although the authors represent a variety of perspectives, all are agreed that ethical and economic concerns cannot and should not be separated.
 
Peter Heslam is director of the Capitalism Project and Lecturer in Social and Economic Ethics at the London Institute for Contemporary Christianity and a Tutor at Ridley Hall in Cambridge.


To Read: ONE NATION, UNDERPRIVILEGED: Why American Poverty Affects Us All by Mark Robert Rank (New York, NY: Oxford University Press, 2004; 356 pages; $29.95)
 
Despite its enormous wealth, the United States leads the industrialized world in poverty. One Nation, Underprivileged unravels this disturbing paradox by offering a unique and radically different understanding of American poverty. It debunks many of our most common myths about the poor while at the same time providing a powerful new framework for addressing this enormous social and economic problem.
 
Mark Robert Rank is the Herbert S. Hadley Professor of Social Welfare in the George Warren Brown School of Social Work at Washington University in St. Louis.