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New Orleans Cathedral Services, November 2005
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Diocese of Lousiana Resource Center

The Diocese of Louisiana plans to set up four or five resource centers to help people deal with housing and other issues. Current and potential sites include Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans (shown above), Holy Comforter church on the University of New Orleans campus and Christ Church in Slidell.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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St. Paul's Episcopal Church in the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans was flooded with more than six feet of water.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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The high-water mark of the post-Katrina floods is plainly visible along St. Paul's entryway.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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The water marred carvings that flank St. Paul's doors.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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Mold now grows everywhere at St. Paul's.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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As power remains out in the Lakeview area, the morning sun shines in on the jumbled pews in the nave of St. Paul's Episcopal Church.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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More than six feet of water filled the nave at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in the Lakeview neighborhood of New Orleans. When the water receded, it left the pews in jumbles.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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The rising floodwaters floated the pews of St. Paul's Episcopal Church in the Lakeview area of New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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Paint buckled from the flood is visible on the sill below one of St. Paul's stained glass windows.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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Pews strewn by the floodwaters now block the nave entrance in St. Paul's Episcopal Church in the Lakeview area of New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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St. Pauls Episcopal Church, Vestments Damage

Even the vestments in St. Paul's sacristy show the progress of the rising and falling waters.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)


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New Orleans Jazz Orchestra founder Irvin Mayfield

New Orleans Jazz Orchestra founder Irvin Mayfield led his orchestra in the debut of "All the Saints" November 17 at Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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Bicentennial Commemoration New Orleans Cathedral

About 40 people attended the bicentennial commemoration of the bicentennial anniversary November 17 of the first non-Roman Catholic service in the Louisiana Purchase.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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Louisiana Bishop Charles Jenkins blesses the congregation

Louisiana Bishop Charles Jenkins blesses the congregation attending the bicentennial anniversary November 17 of the first non-Roman Catholic service in the Louisiana Purchase.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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The first non-Roman Catholic service in the Louisiana Purchase was held at the Cabildo on November 17, 1805, when Episcopal priest Philander Chase offered a service of Morning Prayer. Until the United States purchased the Louisiana Territory, the Cabildo, in Jackson Square in the French Quarter, was the seat of the Spanish Colonial government in New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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People coming to the distribution center at New Orleans' Christ Church Cathedral are greeted by this sign as well as a worker who asks them to fill out a short form so that they can keep track people's needs. Along with the center's inventory, workers often broker on-the-spot donations from people with material to offer to others who need it.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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Supplies, including crutches, are stored in a courtyard at Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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New Orleans Christ Church Cathedral relief center

New Orleans' Christ Church Cathedral, on St. Charles Avenue., opened a relief center in the early days after the hurricane as the city re-opened. It began by giving away water and cleaning supplies. The center is set up on the front lawn and offerings clothes and shoes, personal-hygiene items, baby supplies, water and food supplements. It has met about 25,000 requests for help.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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The Very Rev. David Allard DuPlantier asperses the crowd

While Irvin Mayfield plays the dirge, the Very Rev. David Allard DuPlantier, dean of Christ Church Cathedral New Orleans, inspires the crowd gathered on November 16 at St. Louis Cemetery #1 in New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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Jan Carr reading the 23rd Psalm

Jan Carr read the 23rd Psalm during the prayers for New Orleans November 16 at St. Louis Cemetery #1. Louisiana Bishop Charles Jenkins, right, blessed the people and musician Irvin Mayfield played the crowd out of the cemetery and into the French Quarter.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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The second line procession leaves St. Louis Cemetery #1

Members of the band begin to play as the second line procession leave St. Louis Cemetery #1 in New Orleans.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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Irvin Mayfield led the crowd from St. Louis Cemetery #1

Jazz musician and composer Irvin Mayfield led the band and the crowd from St. Louis Cemetery #1 and through New Orleans' French Quarter in the first such parade, known as a second line, since Hurricane Katrina hit the city.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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The Very Rev. David Allard dePlantier blesses the second line

The Very Rev. David Allard dePlantier, dean of Christ Church Cathedral in New Orleans, blesses the second line with the holy water in an gesture that he said was a "symbolic cleansing of our city" and a reminder of our baptisms when we rise to new life.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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The second line moves through the French Quarter.

The second line, the first since Hurricane Katrina, moves through the French Quarter. Second lines grew out of the new Orleans tradition of fraternal groups and burial societies who often competed to see which group could send off a member in the greatest style. When the service was over, and the procession moved from church to cemetery, the band played sad hymns and dirges. On the way back, the music became more joyful. The second liners, the mourners following the band, danced with wild abandon and usually sported umbrellas and handkerchiefs.
(ENS Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg)

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