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Ron Abrams is 2006 Woods Fellow in Residence at Virginia Seminary

10/11/2006

The Rev. Ron Abrams  

 
[Episcopal News Service]  The Rev. Ron Abrams, rector of St. James Parish, Wilmington, North Carolina, is the 2006 Cecil Woods Fellow in residence at Virginia Theological Seminary (VTS).

The Cecil Woods Graduate Fellowship Fund was established in 1983 by the Alumni Association Executive Committee in appreciation for the positive ways that Granville Cecil Woods, Jr. (VTS '53) influenced VTS during his administration as dean from 1969-1982. The Fellowship enables a person to stay in residence at the seminary for up to two months of research and study. It is important not only for the individuals it directly endows, but to the seminary community which benefits from having different scholars in residence, and the Church by providing more opportunities for study and enrichment.

"Virginia Theological Seminary is honored to have the Rev. Ron Abrams, as the 2006-2007 Woods Fellow in Residence," the Rev. Dr. Michael Battle, dean of Academic Affairs and vice president at VTS, said. "This Fellowship seeks to honor those who exhibit extraordinary ministry by offering our own extraordinary facility and community of VTS and thereby continue to live into the gracious stewardship of our resources."

Abrams (VTS '82) served as deputy to the General Convention in 2000, 2003, and 2006. He was chair of the deputation from the Diocese of East Carolina, and a member of the Ministry Committee at General Convention in 2003 and 2006. Additionally, Abrams was a member of the House of Deputies Committee on the State of the Church.

During his residence at the seminary, Abrams will complete an article titled, "Where have all the Manners gone?" and a children's book, "The Crooked Steeple." A third project will include research on Jon Meacham's book, "American Gospel," in which he explores the real meaning behind the U.S. Founding Fathers idea of the separation of church and state.

He and his wife Kathleen have two sons, Kyle, 19, and Ryan, 16.